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Irazu volcano

Listed under Volcanoes in Costa Rica.

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Irazu is Costa Rica's tallest volcano. You can drive to the summit which is 3432 meters above sea level. On a clear day you can see both the Caribbean and Pacific coasts from the top, where there are several craters. In 1723 Irazu erupted violently and destroyed the former capitol Cartago. Irazu's last significant eruption was in 1963 during U.S. President John Kennedy's official visit to Costa Rica. Irazu is currently quiet but may reawaken at any time. However, the neighboring volcano Turrialba is currently active and its towering gas plume can often be seen from Irazu. Go as early as possible to get the best views.

Written by  Mike Lyvers.

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