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Supai in the Havasupi Indian Reservation

Listed under Traditional Cultures in Southwest Desert, United States.

  • Photo of Supai in the Havasupi Indian Reservation
  • Photo of Supai in the Havasupi Indian Reservation
  • Photo of Supai in the Havasupi Indian Reservation
  • Photo of Supai in the Havasupi Indian Reservation
  • Photo of Supai in the Havasupi Indian Reservation
  • Photo of Supai in the Havasupi Indian Reservation
  • Photo of Supai in the Havasupi Indian Reservation
  • Photo of Supai in the Havasupi Indian Reservation
Photo of Supai in the Havasupi Indian Reservation
Photo by Mike Lyvers
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Supai is a native American village situated deep in Havasu Canyon, a branch of the western Grand Canyon. Located on the Havasupai Indian Reservation, it is the most remote settlement in the 'lower 48' United States. Reaching Supai requires a 65-mile drive down a dead-end road, followed by a 10-mile trek in the desert sun - be sure to carry lots of water.

Beyond the village of Supai is a fabled Shangri-la of azure travertine pools and beautiful waterfalls incongruously situated in the middle of the red rock desert. Havasu means “blue-green waters,” the incredible color of the river being due to the high concentration of dissolved calcite. Havasupai means “people of the blue-green waters.”

The trail to Supai is shared by the only remaining Pony Express in the USA – horse trains bringing mail and supplies to and from Supai. The unexpectedly lush Havasu Canyon, with its aquamarine river and green forests, is an incongruous Eden in this inhospitable land of cactus and red rock.

The pools at the base of Havasu Falls are wonderful to swim in, while the 200-foot high travertine wall at Mooney Falls can be negotiated by a precipitous trail that descends steeply through a series of small caves. A few miles farther down Havasu Canyon is the Colorado River at the bottom of the Grand Canyon, but the trail there is not maintained. A helicopter is available in Supai if you think you can't make the hike back out in the blazing desert sun.

Written by  Mike Lyvers.

Comments, reviews and questions by other travellers

Is there a way to raft in, camp, raft out, without taking the guided tour?

Just wondering if there is a way to hike into havsupai from the Colorado river. Either a short raft or "other" dirt road or hiking trail?

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