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Allghoi Khorkhoi or The Mongolian Death Worm

Listed under Monster Hunting in Mongolia.

Photo of Allghoi Khorkhoi or The Mongolian Death Worm
Photo by flickr user dospaz
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Under the remote sandy emptiness of the Gobi Desert lurks one of the most fearsome creatures ever conceived by man, god or evolution. Four feet of smooth bloated salami body, like a cows intestine, with a tiny tulip of a mouth which spits acid venom and blind eyes capable of delivering high voltage charges to their prey, The Mongolian Death Worm is said to have the disposition of the most psychopathic of feral animals.

Allghoi Khorkhoi is so feared in Mongolia that the mention of its name is thought to attract bad luck and it is supposed to have murdered hundreds of people since the early 19th Century when a team of Russian scientists confirmed its existence. Recent sightings have been rare, or else as cryptozoologists believe people have been afraid to speak about their encounters for fear of attracting the creature's rude bad luck. Four scientific teams have combed the desert of Mongolia for Allghoi Khorkhoi since 1990, but none have come back with anything more than hearsay and frightening stories.

If this nightmare were to exist it wouldn’t be a member of the soft moisture loving worm family but would have to be made of something much tougher to survive in the dry sand of the desert, so it is much more likely that it’s a kind of snake or its terrified audience has failed to notice tiny limbs that it would place it within the skink species of lizards. Snake experts suggest that from descriptions it sounds most similar to the Death Adder or Cobra, both which spit venom (though neither has the corrosive powers of acid.). It’s electrical properties are the most difficult for believers to reconcile, the only creatures known to use electricity as a weapon are eels, who can’t live in the desert. So while scientists accept the possibility of Allghoi Khorkhoi’s existence, they query its murderous intentions and purported ability to kill humans so easily.

Curiously the Mongolian Death Worm is said to be attracted to the colour yellow and that the corrosion caused by its acid venom is also bright yellow.

Written by  World Reviewer Staff.

Comments, reviews and questions by other travellers

actualy this picture isnt the picture of ОЛГОЙ ХОРХОЙ.I HAVE SEEN IT ONCE BEFORE 3 YEARS IN OUR GOBI DESSERT.ITS SIZE OF BODY MUST BE MUCH BIGGER THAN THAT ONE WHICH IS TAKEN ON THE PICTURE.I THINK THIS IS THE PICTURE OF SOME INSECT WHICH WE CAN SEE IT AFTER THE RAIN IN MONGOLIAN KHANGAI REGION ON SUMMER TIME.

1 Reply

You're right! This isn't a picture of the Mongolian Death Worm, like Bigfoot and the Loch Ness Monster there aren't any proven photos.

BAMBAM: I fear you are indeed correct in regard to the scale of the cryptid displayed above, but I nevertheless consider it worth pointing out that the photograph in fact appears to depict the Finja Khorkhoi - the so-called Death Worm's closest (and considerably smaller) relative, proof of the existence of which is far more widely available on numerous cryptozoology blogs. Ostensibly not dissimilar to our common Oligochaeta, its inner workings give the game away somewhat in that they are built around a system of between five and eight very short digestive tracts situated consecutively, the better to metabolise the blood which the creature sucks from the lower extremities of unwary mammals - usually Mongolia's highly valued livestock (mainly goats and sheep). Given that it is not widespread enough to have even been photographed in such a manner as to provide conclusive proof of its existence as a species in its own right, you will be relieved to know that it does not cause unmanageable problems for the country's farmers. It is apparently possible to identify the Finja worm from the outside, too, as it sports a set of very tiny mouthparts akin to those found in the Hirudinea and is also said to secrete a sticky, yellowish substance when stressed.

On another note entirely, sometimes deserts DO in fact have stones in them. Ayers Rock is quite a good example.

As you mightn't be able to tell, this picture at the top is done close-up. The pieces of dirt on the ground are tiny and there seems to be some sort of stone on the Ground which a desert would NOT have. The Mongolian Death Worm is, allegedly, a rather large "worm" (or most likely a lizard or snake if it were to exist). It is rumoured to be 0.6 to 1.5 meters (3-5 feet) long and with the width of a fully grown human's arm, not the size of an earthworm! And this image looks suspiciously photoshopped...

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