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Sahara Desert

Listed under Deserts in Sahara Desert, Libya.

  • Photo of Sahara Desert
  • Photo of Sahara Desert
  • Photo of Sahara Desert
Photo of Sahara Desert
Photo by flickr user bachmont
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The world's largest desert aside from Antarctica, the Sahara Desert is bounded in the North by the Atlas mountains and covers 8.6 million square kilometers - nearly all of North Africa. Despite the extreme temperatures (up to 136C in the daytime and well below freezing at night), parts of the Sahara Desert are now surprisingly accessible and there is a burgeoning tourist industry.

Being under the trade wind belt gives the Sahara Desert a constantly changing face; its enormous sand seas and dunes ('Chgaga', the tallest, is over 500 meters high) are re-sculpted daily by sand-filled air currents such as the simoom and sirocco.

The pristine nature of the Sahara Desert means that unusual discoveries are regularly made, such as the 19-mile wide meteor crater discovered in Egypt in 2006. The impact of the meteor heated the surroundings to such an extent that it melted the sand, forming lime green glass, pieces of which can be found amongst the dunes. Twisted rock formations rear up from a desolate landscape of dry river valleys and steep gorges, and caves filled with carvings and paintings from before the Sahara Desert was formed, such as the Cave of Swimmers, bear testament to the its watery beginnings.

Just as it can reveal wonders, legend has it that the Sahara Desert devours cities, explorers and whole armies, as in the story of King Cambyses of Persia, whose army of 10,000 men disappeared there 2,500 years ago and the remains of which Sahara Desert explorers are still searching for.

Written by  larapiegeler.

Other expert and press reviews

“My new role as Ursula, queen of the desert”

By Ursula Kenny for The Observer. First published Sunday 21st September 2008. ...The first evening establishes the routine for all five nights in the desert; we find somewhere suitable to camp and the guides unload the camels and distribute luggage. A… Read more...

Written by press. See the full article in The Observer, 21st September 2008

Comments, reviews and questions by other travellers

why sahara desert never get rained after the meteor strikes?

thnks for sharing this valuable post! thnks again, why sahara desert never get rained after the meteor strikes?

The world's largest desert aside from Antarctica, the Sahara Desert is bounded in the North by the Atlas mountains and covers 8.6 million square kilometers - nearly all of North Africa. Despite the extreme temperatures (up to 136C in the daytime and well below freezing at night), parts of the Sahara Desert are now surprisingly accessible and there is a burgeoning tourist industry.

Being under the trade wind belt gives the Sahara Desert a constantly changing face; its enormous sand seas and dunes ('Chgaga', the tallest, is over 500 meters high) are re-sculpted daily by sand-filled air currents such as the simoom and sirocco.

The pristine nature of the Sahara Desert means that unusual discoveries are regularly made, such as the 19-mile wide meteor crater discovered in Egypt in 2006. The impact of the meteor heated the surroundings to such an extent that it melted the sand, forming lime green glass, pieces of which can be found amongst the dunes. Twisted rock formations rear up from a desolate landscape of dry river valleys and steep gorges, and caves filled with carvings and paintings from before the Sahara Desert was formed, such as the Cave of Swimmers, bear testament to the its watery beginnings.

Just as it can reveal wonders, legend has it that the Sahara Desert devours cities, explorers and whole armies, as in the story of King Cambyses of Persia, whose army of 10,000 men disappeared there 2,500 years ago and the remains of which Sahara Desert explorers are still searching for.

Written by khalid and tayal and navida ramani

it really amazing information about sahara desert

i needed and it really helped me in my assignment thanks

it is amazing and so safe thank you

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