Yesterday was full of rain – from when we woke up until 5 p.m. it was a constant and miserable kind of drizzle. Despite the poor weather, we made a very full day of it.  We took the free shuttle in at 10:30 and had a very mediocre (but cheap!) brunch one block from the Museo de la Revolucion.

Lora and I spent a good 3 hours browsing the very odd propaganda-filled museum, which is housed in the old Presidential Palace. Some things I learned: Che Guevara is really hot; so is Fidel Castro but less so; the Revolution and overthrow of Batista is a really fascinating story; Fidel doesn’t hate America, he hates the capitalist nature of American society and the holier-than-thou mentality of the U.S. Administration. 

The museum lacks modern updates, so bringing my camera in (for an extra $2) to take photos of the displays and interior of the “palace” was pretty useless. Nearly everything was displayed in glass cases, and most of the Revolutionary artifacts were copied photos. There were some seemingly worthless items on display as well, such as spoons used by second commanders or patches worn by soldiers, but other items like Fidel, Raul, and Che’s attire or letters were rather interesting to see.

In all, the Cuban Revolution that culminated with Castro & Co’s march into Habana was an awfully great feat of determination and heroism. In school in America we learn about Fidel is a completely different way, so I’m grateful to have learned both sides of the same story.

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