A couple of days ago, in the town of Chiang Mai in northern Thailand, I went out one evening to visit a Buddhist wat for a chat with the monks and some guided meditation. I got out of my tuk tuk on a quiet street of what looked like a one-street village, with a temple in the middle.

Then a smiling young monk approached me and we sat down for a chat. Touy Yai was his name. He laughingly translated his name as Big Fat, reflecting his hefty constitution. He explained to me that the high monk is typically in charge of visitors but he was away for a month of meditation. He was here to stand in. He offered me some water and we started our chat.

 

Continue reading on everthenomad

Comments by other travellers

There are no posts. Why not be the first to have your say?

Post a comment

I want to
Question
My comment - optional
Rating - how would you rate this place or experience?
 

About this author

  • Anja Mutic

    I'm a traveler who writes and a writer who travels. I travel to make a living, I write to travel, I live to take the next trip.…

Also by this author

  • Why I love Bolivia

    As a travel writer, one of the questions I get asked all the time is: "What is your favorite country?"

  • South Africa though Street Art

    I walked away from my recent trip to South Africa emotional, contemplative, quiet. While my first ever safari experience, in Sabi Sand Game Reserve, was one of the most adrenaline-filled fun jaunts of my worldwide travels, what really touched me – more th

  • The Markets of Angola

    I've wandered many markets of the world – strolled through the souks of Morocco, roamed the rickety stalls of Phnom Penh's Russian Market and shopped for talismans at the Witches' Market in Bolivia's La Paz.

  • Croatia Beyond the Coast

    It's always exciting to revisit the motherland and discover new things about my country. For someone born and raised there, the challenge always is how to see it from a tourist's perspective.

Latest travel blog posts