Flying fox

Flying fox

1) Is there any g-forces in flying fox 2) Is there any wind resistance 3) Do they use different types of line for different people 4) What is the terminal velocity on a flying fox 5) How long does it take to get up to terminal velocity 6) What materials are used to create the wire of the flying fox 7) What forces are in place while you are on a flying fox 8) Is there any friction on a flying fox 9) What is the safety plan if something goes wrong 10) What is the maximum use of a certain wire? 1) Why do they call flying fox 2) What are the injures u might get on a flying fox 3) When was the first flying fox invented 4) Who invented flying foxing 5) Does weight matter 6) When was the first person go on a flying fox 7) Has anyone died from a flying fox 8) What is the maximum speed of a flying fox 9) What is the miminuman age to go on a flying fox 10) What is the maximum age to go on a flying fox

Question about Mokai Gravity Canyon Flying Fox

I'm going to be nationalistic and say I think it's an Australian thing because I know we also call fruit bats flying foxes. Americans tend to call the same things ziplines. I also know the general pulley set up was used by the Australian Army to transport things in the war - but I don't know when the first one was used or where the idea came from. They're quite basic things - it's just gravity, a rope and some pulleys - so there's no g-forces to encounter or standard minimum or maximum ages - each flying fox is rigged up differently and lots of them are in children's playgrounds. On the larger, more professional ones you often have to wear a harness, helmet and gloves - again, each one has different safety requirements.